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Reptiles
> Advice > Reptiles

Reptiles

We treat and provide advice for a wide range of “exotic” pets.

Vet, Richard Edwards, has a particular interest in reptiles and is available for consultation mainly at the West Meads surgery.

In addition, AlphaPet has two qualified veterinary nurses, Charlotte Sampson RVN and Sue Eaton RVN, who both have particular interests and expertise in chelonians (tortoises and turtles) and both are able to provide expert advice on all aspects of their husbandry.

Many of the conditions we see are associated with the environment these pets are kept in. Frequently, this is because no one has provided appropriate advice about what conditions they need to stay fit and healthy.

Below is a selection of basic advice and information sheets some of the common reptile pet species we see.

If you have concerns about your pet or just want to be reassured that what you are doing is actually correct, please call us on 01243 842832 and book an appointment.

 

Reducing the risks of Salmonella infection from reptiles: advice for owners

Keeping reptiles carries some health risks which all owners should be aware of and take appropriate precautions to protect themselves and their families. Salmonella is a particularly common risk.

Click on this link to access a leaflet (produced by the Health Protection Agency, Department of Health, and Defra) that provides advice to reptile owners regarding measures to reduce the risk of contracting Salmonella infections from their pets.

An ongoing outbreak of Salmonella Typhiumurium DT191a infections in humans has been linked to reptile owners handling infected feeder mice, and has highlighted the need to raise awareness of the risk of such infections.

 

  Tortoises

Tortoises

Tortoise Information Sheet   AlphaPet Tortoise Clinics Tortoises are a surprisingly common pet in the UK. Many of them are decades old and have been handed down through the family. Several species can live up to 100 years old, if they are well cared for in a captive environment! The areas of husbandry,... read more »

  Bearded Dragons

Bearded Dragons

Introduction Bearded Dragons are very docile reptiles and relatively easy to keep in captivity, although, as with all exotic pets, things will go wrong if you don’t do your homework and pay attention to detail! Australian Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps) are in the Agama family, which is composed of around... read more »

  Royal Pythons

Royal Pythons

  Also known as “Ball Snakes” due to their tendency to roll up into a ball when handled. Royal Pythons are generally considered to be good natured and docile snakes. Their relatively small size also makes them popular as pets. They are widely kept throughout the world as... read more »

  Yellow Bellied Turtles

Yellow Bellied Turtles

A bit more about the Yellow Bellied Turtles... Yellow bellied turtles are native to the Eastern United States but are captive bred in the UK. Their Latin name is: Trachemys scripta elegans. Other names you will see are the Yellow Bellied Terrapin or Slider. They are all the same animal. The... read more »

  Horned Frogs

Horned Frogs

Horned Frogs South American horned frogs are also known as “pacman frogs” due to the size of their mouths and abdomen, hence they are said to resemble the video game Pac‐Man. They are called “horned” due to the triangular prolongation of the edge of the upper eyelid. This actually... read more »